Virginia Satir

Famous family therapist. Author of PeopleMaking. "Mother of family systems therapy"

Virginia Satir (26 June 1916 – 10 September 1988) was an American author and social worker, known especially for her approach to family therapy and her work with family reconstruction. She is widely regarded as the "Mother of Family Therapy"[1][2] Her most well-known books are Conjoint Family Therapy, 1964, Peoplemaking, 1972, and The New Peoplemaking, 1988. https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Virginia_Satir

Family therapy, also referred to as couple and family therapy, marriage and family therapy, family systems therapy, and family counseling, is a branch of psychotherapy that works with families and couples in intimate relationships to nurture change and development. It tends to view change in terms of the systems of interaction between family members. It emphasizes family relationships as an important factor in psychological health... The movement received an important boost starting in the early 1950s through the work of anthropologist Gregory Bateson and colleagues – Jay Haley, Donald D. Jackson, John Weakland, William Fry, and later, Virginia Satir, Paul Watzlawick and others – at Palo Alto in the United States, who introduced ideas from cybernetics and general systems theory into social psychology and psychotherapy, focusing in particular on the role of Communication (see Bateson Project). This approach eschewed the traditional focus on individual psychology and historical factors – that involve so-called linear causation and content – and emphasized instead FeedBack and homeostatic mechanisms and “rules” in here-and-now interactions – so-called circular causation and process – that were thought to maintain or exacerbate problems, whatever the original cause(s).[4][5] (See also systems psychology and systemic therapy.) This group was also influenced significantly by the work of US psychiatrist, hypnotherapist, and brief therapist, Milton Erickson. https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Family_therapy

Definer of the Five Freedoms and Three Universal Questions. Creator of the Temperature Reading process.


Commenter asks: I am trying to find a critique on Conjoint Family Therapy by V. Satir


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